Ethnic Studies

The Ethnic Studies Concentration is an interdisciplinary program focused on the experiences of historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups (including African, Latina/o, Asian, and Native Americans) within the United States. The program promotes a broader understanding of the historical, geographical, political, economic, social, and cultural complexity of these racial/ethnic groups, and the structural inequality in which these group experiences are maintained and embedded.

Ethnic Studies courses often explore the rich contributions to the production of knowledge issuing from various racial/ethnic groups in the US that tend to be underrepresented in the curriculum, for example, in sciences, social sciences, arts, humanities, and the professions. As a discipline emerging out of civil rights movements, Ethnic Studies courses also often explore historical and contemporary social movements and encourage active and reflective learning in the pursuit of racial and social justice. The curriculum emphasizes creating a community within the classroom where students learn from one another, experience personal empowerment, and develop as agents of racial and social justice in a diverse and complex world. As a result, students will develop a heightened racial, ethnic, and social consciousness toward promoting a more just and equitable society.

 

Program Structure and Requirements

  • Offered as an interdisciplinary concentration

  • 15 credits total across at least two disciplines

  • Required course (3 credits): ET-100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

  • Core Courses (12 Credits): Chosen from approved list of electives across departments

Faculty

As an interdisciplinary concentration, Ethnic Studies draws its core faculty from multiple disciplines across campus. Each faculty member's information can be found at the respective department for each of the courses. Additionally, the Ethnic Studies Program seeks to build linkages between Academic Affairs and Student Affairs to support students’ academic success and the enrichment of the campus culture.  The Program Coordinator for Ethnic Studies is Dr. Hardeep Sidhu in the Department of English.

Required Course

ET-100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LASC Categories: TLC, HBS, DAC

An interdisciplinary survey course analyzing socio-political, economic, historical and contemporary issues related to African American, Latino/a American, Asian American and Native American (ALANA) communities.

Every year. 3 Credits

 

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed below, departments frequently offer special topics courses that qualify as Ethnic Studies electives. Recent examples include HI 250: African Immigration in the 20th Century, PO 450: Politics of Black Hair, and SO 420: Sociology of Race and Ethnicity.

ED-270 Diversity & Multicultural Ed

LASC Categories: DAC

Prerequisites: ED-207.

Analyzes goals, values, and practices in educating culturally diverse populations. Includes bilingual, special needs and gifted students.

Every year. 3 Credits

ED-339 Children's Literature: Multicultural Literature for PK-9

LASC Categories: HBS, TLC, DAC

Facets of literature for children and criteria for the selection of each, techniques and preparation and use.

Fall and Spring and every year. 3 Credits

EN-120 Race in Comics

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC

Comics offers a unique combination of tools for representing race. Artists have long used either language or visual art to think about identity, but comics merges the two in new ways. In this course, students analyze innovative comics and graphic novels/nonfiction to better understand why this medium is such a productive way to reflect on racial identity. How do comics authors engage with the difficult history of racial caricature and the longstanding lack of diversity in the field? And what can the combination of image and text say about the tension between appearance and identity?

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

EN-169 Ethnic Literature in the U.S.

LASC Categories: USW, TLC, DAC

Study of ethnic literature in the U.S., focusing on African- American, Asian-American, Latino, and Native-American writers.

Fall and Spring. 3 Credits

EN-170 Search for Identity

LASC Categories: DAC, TLC

Understanding the nature and power of fiction, the relation between problems of individual identity, and the operation of the imagination.

Other or on demand. 3 Credits

EN-328 Narratives of U.S. Immigration

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC, WAC

Prerequisites: EN-102 or EN-202

In this course students examine narratives of United States immigration in literature, film, and history. The immigrant narrative is both a foundational American story and also a story of the outsider to American culture. Students explore how authors navigate these conflicting poles, and how they complicate myths of the U.S. as a melting pot and land of opportunity. Topics for discussion include: assimilation and pluralism; citizenship, class, ethnicity, gender, language, nationality, race, and religion; diaspora; labor; nativism and xenophobia; and the social, legal, and political history of American immigration.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

EN-347 Studies in U.S. Ethnic Literature

LASC Categories: USW

Prerequisites: EN-102

Selected topics in U.S. ethnic literature, including thematic and comparative approaches,and in-depth studies of a single ethnic literature.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

EN-370 Antislavery Literature

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC, WAC

Prerequisites: EN-102 or EN-202 or EN-250

This course traces the literary history of the antislavery movement in the Atlantic World: writing in a range of genres (journalism, history, fiction, poetry, drama, slave narratives), antislavery writers made a significant contribution to the campaigns to end the slave trade and slavery. While the Atlantic system of legal slavery ended in the nineteenth century, an even larger system of illegal slavery still exists, and so the course concludes by considering the work of twenty-first century antislavery writers and what they might learn from their predecessors. In other words, can we use literary history to make slavery history?

Fall only and every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

HC-234 Multiculturalism and Health

Examination of diverse ethnic/racial and cultural beliefs beliefs and practices affecting health and illness

Spring only and every year. 3 Credits

HI-205 Native America

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC

This survey covers the broad sweep of Native American history and focuses on the encounter between American and European civilizations and how Native culture has adapted through the centuries.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

HI-208 American Immigrant History

Survey of immigration. Topics such as old-world background, impact on the United States, nativism, cultural pluralism, religion, mobility, family and politics. [Applicable to the Global Studies Concentration.]

Every year. 3 Credits

HI-217 US Social History

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC, WAC

Prerequisites: EN-102 or EN-202

Survey of social and cultural history. Topics such as family, religion, education, popular literature, architecture, transportation, and reform. [Applicable to the Womens Studies Concentration.]

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

HI-221 African-American History I

The people of African descent from the emergence of the slave trade to the Civil War, focusing on race, gender, and power. [Applicable to the Global Studies Concentration.]

Every year. 3 Credits

HI-222 African-American History II

The people of African descent from the end of the Civil War through the twentieth century, focusing on race, class, gender, and power.

Every year. 3 Credits

HI-230 Nicaragua, the US and the World

LASC Categories: DAC, TLC, USW

The course will examine the impact of globalization and imperialism on the lives of Nicaraguans at home and in their diasporic communities. [Applicable to the Global Studies Concentration.]

Spring only and every year. 3 Credits

HI-248 Seminar on Globalization & Human Rights

LASC Categories: USW, GP, DAC

A.I.D. program participants in their sophomore year will explore globalization and human rights and issues of personal growth and academic development. [Applicable to the Global Studies Concentration.]

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

HI-280 Introduction to African Diaspora History

LASC Categories: TLC, GP, DAC

Prerequisites: HI-103 or HI-104

Students will learn about the development of the African diaspora and how it has shaped the world since antiquity. We will consider the movements, experiences, and exploits of ordinary people and celebrated figures of African descent through such topics as imperial expansion; slavery, resistance, and freedom; nationalism and the civil rights movement; and current global issues. [Applicable to the Global Studies Concentration.]

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

HI-320 Citizen Nation

LASC Categories: CON, TLC, USW, DAC, WAC

Prerequisites: HI-111 or HI-112 and EN-102 or EN-202

Explores the history and meaning of citizenship in the United States, including discrimination, rights struggles and changing citizenship criteria. [Cross-listed with PO-320.]

Fall only and every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

PH-151 Race, Gender, and the Law

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, CON

This course provides a philosophical approach to issues of race and gender as expressed in legislation, judicial interpretation, enforcement, and public policy.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

PH-178 Africana Philosophy

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC

Explores the philosophy of the African diaspora in African, African American and Caribbean writings. The course addresses both historical and contemporary material across intersections of race, gender, and class using philosophy, history, and literature.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

PH-254 Feminist Theory

LASC Categories: HBS, USW, DAC

Feminist Theory: Examines the development of feminist ideas and movements from the 18th century to the present, in the US and, particularly in recent decades, globally. A close analysis of Second Wave, Postmodern, and Black Feminist ideas are studied as a basis for writings and social action that attends to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, using intersectional methodologies and critiques to address issues of reproduction and health, labor and economic power, violence, and state power.

Other or on demand and every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

PO-265 Racial and Ethnic Politics

LASC Categories: HBS, USW, DAC

This class will analyze the relationship between the United States government and racial and ethnic groups and explore the way that race is utilized in American politics. We will focus on issues affecting racial and ethnic communities in the United States, the politics behind racial and ethnic classification, and the use of racial and ethnic appeals in American political campaigns. The readings for this course will cover topics such as affirmative action, criminal justice reform, and civil rights. It will offer students an opportunity to analyze political speeches and advertisements that utilize race and ethnicity.

Every 2-3 years. 3 Credits

PO-320 Citizen Nation

LASC Categories: CON, TLC, USW, DAC, WAC

Prerequisites: HI-111 or HI-112 and EN-102, EN-202 or EN-250

Explores the history and meaning of citizenship in the United States, including discrimination, rights struggles and changing citizenship criteria. [Cross-listed with HI-320.]

Other or on demand. 3 Credits

PS-255 Psychological Foundations of Diversity

Prerequisites: PS-101 with a C- or above.

Explores the gender, racial/ethnic, multiple-group membership, cultural, social class, religious, disability and sexual orientation facets of diversity.

Other or on demand and every year. 3 Credits

SO-228 Latina-Latino Experiences in the U.S. and the World

LASC Categories: TLC, USW, DAC

This course surveys current theoretical approaches used to explain Latina/o experiences and provides an empirical overview of how social institutions affect the daily lives of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. and the world.

3 Credits

SO-285 Race, Class and Gender

LASC Categories: HBS, DAC

An introduction to dominant-minority group relations through the investigation of the patterns and dynamics of differentiation, inequality and discrimination.

Fall and Spring. 3 Credits

SP-333 Hispanic Presence in US

LASC Categories: GP, USW, DAC

Prerequisites: SP-321

Socio-cultural study of Hispanics in the United States, with a focus on major contemporary issues. Conducted un Spanish. [Prerequisites: Two SP 200 level courses.]

Fall only and every year. 3 Credits

SP-349 Spanish-American Literature

Prerequisites: SP-321

Representative works from South and Central American authors from the colonial period to the present.

Fall only and every 2-3 years. 3 Credits